How Do You Budget? Scarcity Budgeting Works Best for Me.

Wealth is created in the space between your income and expenses. If you’re interested in growing wealth, I suggest you grow your income and manage your expenses. If you’re like me, you enjoy increasing income more than reducing costs. But, if you don’t keep an eye on your expenses it is very easy to over-spend. 

I believe the most efficient way to manage your expenses is to find a budgeting method that works for you. If you’re partnered, you need to determine how to blend your approach with your partner’s - but we’ll explore that in a future post. 

The budgeting approach that works best for me is something I call scarcity budgeting. At a high level, the idea is to set up your finances such that you do not have excess money in your checking account. By creating scarcity, you don’t have the ability to comfortably over-spend or let your money sneak away from you.

Here are the four steps to scarcity budgeting:

1. Track your expenses to understand what you’re currently spending. Then, based on your actual expenses, decide what you want to reduce, change, or keep the same. For example, you might be appalled that you’re spending $1,250 monthly on food, drink, and eating out. Or, you may be disappointed that you aren’t investing enough for your future or donating enough to the charitable causes that matter most to you.

2. Automate your finances. I do this by having separate accounts for things that aren’t daily expenses. Travel, fun money to splurge on shoes or gifts, and boring necessities like car maintenance are funneled into different savings accounts. Each payday, a certain amount of money automatically transfers out of my account and into these savings accounts. Same for charitable contributions, regular bills, and investing; money is sent to those organizations on a defined schedule.

3. Spend only what’s left. After my money is whisked away, I’m only left with enough to buy gas, groceries, household items, and restaurant meals in accordance with my budget. I keep an eye on my checking account and don’t give in to putting things on credit cards to “tide me over” until my next payday.

4. Save or invest any excess. This is the fun part of scarcity budgeting! (Yes, I’m serious). If my checking account grows too large (because I haven’t been spending that much on regular expenses), I save or invest. This “found money” contributes to my other financial goals and gives me an unexpected financial boost. 

That’s my approach to scarcity budgeting in four steps. For me, this budgeting approach has worked wonders. Because I do not have excess money in my checking at any given time, I am not tempted to spend. Importantly, I rarely use credit cards because I have struggled with credit card debt in the past.

Do you use scarcity budgeting? Is there another approach to budgeting that you prefer? Or, are you one of the financial unicorns who doesn’t budget yet still manages to build wealth? Let me know!

xoxo, Ms. Financier